January 16, 2015 – 7:14 pm | No Comment

The Faculty of Education has a new web presence on UMToday. You can now get all of your Education news and events from the new Faculty of Education Network page. To get there, scroll to the bottom of the main education page and click on News. Or visit the website directly. Or visit UM Today […]

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Alumni, Community, Featured, Headlines, Jobs and Volunteer, Milestones, Research, Student Announcements, Student Life, Video »

New UM Today Education page launched
January 16, 2015 – 7:14 pm | No Comment

The Faculty of Education has a new web presence on UMToday. You can now get all of your Education news and events from the new Faculty of Education Network page.

To get there, scroll to the bottom of the main education page and click on News.

Or visit the website directly.UM today Education Network page promo

Or visit UM Today and click on the arrow beside Network. This will show all of the university’s Network pages. Click on Faculty of Education.

Please note: You can still access the Faculty of Education blog to research older stories, but all new stories and articles will now appear on UMToday.

The UMToday Education page will also have a searchable archive of every story that was posted on the Faculty of Education blog.

Community, Headlines, Student Life »

Deborah Young’s reading for the new year
January 5, 2015 – 4:20 pm | No Comment

Originally posted on UM Today: December 22, 2014 

UM Today checked with Deborah Young, is executive lead, Indigenous achievement, at the U of M, for some reading to open the new year. “Difficult to narrow it down to just five!” as she said — but here are the books she recommended.

1. Decolonizing Education: Nourishing the Learning Spirit by Marie Battiste. A powerful and informative book on why it is important for all levels of schooling — elementary to university and colleges — to undergo transformative change that focuses on sharing Indigenous knowledge and world views in all forms of learning and teaching. One of my favorite books.

See the complete story on the University of Manitoba News Site: UM Today.

Community, Headlines, Research »

Reflections from Rwanda from the Associate Dean of Education (Undergraduate)
December 19, 2014 – 6:31 pm | No Comment

December is Human Rights Month

Originally posted on UM Today: December 15, 2014 

Blood-stained children’s clothing hangs over church pews, little shoes sit abandoned, rows of human skulls show signs of trauma—the horror of the 1994 genocide in Rwanda lives on two decades later.

Education professor Jerome Cranston could picture the atrocities of the past while surveying a makeshift church memorial where thousands of Tutsis—many of them children—were herded and killed. The memorials provide a graphic reminder of one of the worst killing campaigns in history.

“One of the phrases [Rwandans] use is ‘We need to never forget so it never happens anywhere else in the world’,” Cranston says. “They are doing this for Rwandans, but they hope they are doing this for the rest of the world.”

In spring, Cranston travelled to the East African country as it marked the genocide’s 20th anniversary. In just 100 days, ethnic Hutu extremists killed roughly 800,000 people, most of them from the minority Tutsi community. Animosity between the two groups had brewed for years but reached a tipping point when the plane of then-Rwandan President Juvenal Habyarimana, a Hutu, was shot down, killing everyone on board.

See the complete story on the University of Manitoba News Site: UM Today.

Community, Headlines, Milestones »

Education professor wins inaugural Outstanding Role Model Award
December 17, 2014 – 5:03 pm | No Comment
GlenMcCabe award2014

Education Professor Dr. Glen McCabe (left) receives his Outstanding Role Model Award from John Prystanski, founder of the Westland Foundation.

Glen McCabe, an associate professor in the Faculty of Education, has been recognized as an Outstanding Role Model by the Westland Foundation for his lifelong commitment to education as a means to achieve success in life.

In a recent ceremony at Migiizi Agamik (Bald Eagle Lodge) McCabe, a Metis psychologist and a professor in the Educational Administration, Foundations & Psychology department, received the inaugural $5,000 award from John Prystanski of the Westland Foundation.

Prystanski said McCabe, who grew up in inner city Winnipeg, exemplifies the type of role model the Westland Foundation needs to inspire its students. The Westland Foundation focuses on encouraging Winnipeg’s inner city youth to pursue higher education via scholarships.

McCabe grew up in a family where “education wasn’t necessarily valued,” said Prystanski.

By deciding to go to university, eventually receiving his PhD in clinical psychology, “Glen has overcome many of those challenges in terms of what may have been a stigma of education,” said Prystanski.

“He’s made a huge difference. More kids need to know about him. More kids need to know about role models.”

In accepting his award at the ceremony, McCabe said he was “very very honoured.”

“My hope is that someday it will help the Foundation to do more for the whole community, not jut the Aboriginal community.”

He spoke about growing up in what was essentially an “aboriginal ghetto” in the inner city, where life was tough. Streets were filled with drunkenness and fighting and people were lost and lonely, he said. But what made the difference for him, said McCabe, was a loving mother and father who supported him.

When he went to university, his family feared he would turn his back on them once he was educated—and for a time, he did, McCabe said. But once he realized he could be both Aboriginal and educated, he was able to understand who he was.

“It encouraged me to think maybe education would be the answer to me about a lot of things. About a family that cared about me, that wanted me to have success and not stand in my way.”

McCabe has returned to the inner city to work on healing with various groups, including men’s groups, which is part of the reason he was recognized by the Westland Foundation.

His current research interests include: worldwide Indigenous healing methodologies and the relationship between them and current conventional psychological approaches; and the role of community and psychosocial factors in levels of academic success and rates of academic program completion in Aboriginal populations.

Prystanski said that the Foundation hopes to continue the role model program in the future by having students identify individuals who went to their schools and went on to university—in order to emphasize to disadvantaged youth the value of a university education. McCabe exemplifies the kind of role model that the Westland Foundation supports, he said.

“Here’s an individual who grew up in the inner city and decided that I’m going to get an education, and I’m going to make a difference.”

The Foundation provides students who attend eligible inner Winnipeg schools and who achieve an A or B at the end of the year with credits toward university scholarships. Since its inception, the Westland Foundation has raised $1.6 million toward scholarships.

Community, Headlines, Research, Student Announcements, Student Life »

Education student hopes to use academic awards for ‘video games’ thesis
December 11, 2014 – 6:06 pm | No Comment

Helping children develop language and grammar skills has always been important to U of M Master of Education student Anastassiya Yudintseva.

As an English and French teacher in her homeland of Kazakhstan, Yudintseva says her students often found grammar studies “difficult and not relevant” and even “boring.

So, for her thesis here at U of M, she has decided to research ways that educational video games might help students improve grammar skills and increase motivation through “engaging and fun activities.”

Anastasssiya Yudintseva

Anastasssiya Yudintseva

Yudintseva, whose specialization is in Educational Technology and Curriculum Design, has been much-lauded for her academic excellence—receiving three prestigious awards this past fall—the Betty A. Nicks Fellowship, the Manitoba Graduate Fellowship and the Robert A. Rodgers Graduate Award in Education.

She says the Betty A. Nicks Fellowship will assist her with her video game research—exploring whether digital game-based learning can change international students’ attitudes toward grammar and improve their grammar skills—all while helping them to do so in a non-traditional way.

Yudintseva dedicated much of her time during her nine years teaching English and French at Karaganda State University in Kazakhstan working to make language learning enjoyable for students, particularly for ESL (English as a Second Language) pupils.

“Grammar proficiency is considered to be one of the most essential, but least favourite, aspects of Second Language learning,” says Yudintseva, who came to Canada last year.

Yudintseva is hoping to conduct research for her thesis on video game language- learning at the U of M’s International Centre for Students.

Her academic advisor, Orest Cap, says Yudintseva’s choice of thesis topics—“Video gaming in English with EAL [English as an Additional Language] participants” is an innovative choice and one that is of growing interest in the field of education.

Along with her busy academic life, Yudintseva also volunteers with the World W.I.S.E. program and has volunteered in the Reading Buddy Program at Carpathia Elementary School in Winnipeg. As well, she works as an educational assistant at a Winnipeg high school.

Alumni, Community, Featured, Headlines »

Breakfast with the Dean brings education partners together
December 9, 2014 – 3:37 pm | No Comment

A variety of stakeholders from the field of education came together recently to share ideas and learn about the future direction of the Faculty of Education during the 2nd annual Breakfast with the Dean.

Dr. David Mandzuk, Dean of the Faculty, said this sort of gathering of various education stakeholders is unique within the province and is a “reflection of the kind of positive, respectful collaboration” that exists within the group.

bkfast for dean web1

Attendees discuss issues in the field of education at this year’s Breakfast with the Dean.

The event began with Mandzuk highlighting the Faculty’s programs and current enrolments, providing updates on new initiatives and providing an overview of what’s on the horizon.

Following that was an open discussion of various timely topics in the field of education, from the results of Manitoba students in the recent Pan-Canadian Assessment Program (PCAPS)—which resulted in the creation of a math and science task force in the Faculty, to the imminent creation of an Indigenous Teacher Education program, to enrolment targets.

“In [The Faculty of] Education, we have historically taken the lead on these discussions and played a vital role in new initiatives in education,” says Mandzuk.

Among those in attendance for the event were representatives from Manitoba Education & Advanced Learning, the Manitoba Teachers Society, the Manitoba Association of School Superintendents, the Council of School Leaders, the Manitoba First Nations Education Resource Centre, the Manitoba Association of Parent Councils and the Manitoba Federation of Independent Schools.

In all, 12 external partners attended along with eight faculty members and several other staff members.

bkfstwith dean for web2

Dr. David Mandzuk with Barb Isaak, President of the Manitoba Association of School Superintendents.

The group agreed to meet more regularly in the future—rather than just once per year. Plans are underway for more talks to be held this coming April or May, but rather than having a set agenda, Mandzuk wants the stakeholders to submit their ideas for the next discussion so that everyone’s topics of interest are represented.

“All of the stakeholders have a vested interest in the preparation of teachers. We talk to each other and discuss concerns and challenges,” says Mandzuk.

Community, Featured, Headlines, Research, Student Life »

3MT application portal opens Wednesday
December 8, 2014 – 6:01 pm | No Comment

Originally posted on UM Today: December 8, 2014 

Do you “know your stuff” well enough to explain your research to a non-specialist audience?

Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) is open to all University of Manitoba graduate students in thesis-based programs. Each challenger has three minutes―using only a single static slide as an illustration―to clearly explain the nature, goals and significance of his or her research.

“Excellent communications skills are an essential requirement in every graduate student’s skills ‘toolbox’,” says Jay Doering, vice-provost (graduate education) and dean of graduate studies. “3MT® provides graduate students the opportunity to enhance and refine these skills in a way that allows others to understand the nature of research.”

Doering says that today’s graduate students are the future leaders whose innovations will allow Manitoba to compete on a global scale.

See the complete story on the University of Manitoba News Site: UM Today.

Community »

A New International Research Network on Intersectionality, Knowledge Mobilization, and Social Justice in Education
April 22, 2014 – 7:43 pm | No Comment

In the context of the current social and economic climate globally, issues around identity and social justice come to the fore of political, theoretical and practical discussions. Researchers, practitioners and policy makers are confronted with challenges of how to address social inequalities and promote social justice for present and future generations. Yet efforts towards socially just education often struggle for legitimacy with many equity initiatives operating in relative isolation. There is a need to examine the intersectionality of such issues to garner support and build momentum to develop and employ appropriate methodologies that speak with rather than for participants.

Individuals’ identities and inequalities are complex; a growing field of interdisciplinary research recognises that categories such as ethnicity, ‘race’, gender, social class, disability, sexuality and age intersect in intricate ways, shaping social identities and impacting on everyday life experiences. The way that identities and inequalities intersect has been framed in theory and research through the concept of ‘intersectionality’. Intersectional perspectives recognise the heterogeneity of different groups and examine how certain groups are silenced from and marginalised by dominant political debates. Although intersectionality has been central in generating fruitful debates in social and political theory, its implications for the field of social justice in education have yet to be explored. Read the full story »

New UM Today Education page launched
January 16, 2015 – 7:14 pm | No Comment

The Faculty of Education has a new web presence on UMToday. You can now get all of your Education news and events from the new Faculty of Education Network page. To get there, scroll to the bottom of the main education page and click on News. Or visit the website directly. Or visit UM Today […]

Deborah Young’s reading for the new year
January 5, 2015 – 4:20 pm | No Comment

Originally posted on UM Today: December 22, 2014  UM Today checked with Deborah Young, is executive lead, Indigenous achievement, at the U of M, for some reading to open the new year. “Difficult to narrow it down to just five!” as she said — but here are the books she recommended. 1. Decolonizing Education: Nourishing […]

Reflections from Rwanda from the Associate Dean of Education (Undergraduate)
December 19, 2014 – 6:31 pm | No Comment

December is Human Rights Month Originally posted on UM Today: December 15, 2014  Blood-stained children’s clothing hangs over church pews, little shoes sit abandoned, rows of human skulls show signs of trauma—the horror of the 1994 genocide in Rwanda lives on two decades later. Education professor Jerome Cranston could picture the atrocities of the past […]

Education professor wins inaugural Outstanding Role Model Award
December 17, 2014 – 5:03 pm | No Comment

Glen McCabe, an associate professor in the Faculty of Education, has been recognized as an Outstanding Role Model by the Westland Foundation for his lifelong commitment to education as a means to achieve success in life. In a recent ceremony at Migiizi Agamik (Bald Eagle Lodge) McCabe, a Metis psychologist and a professor in the […]

Education student hopes to use academic awards for ‘video games’ thesis
December 11, 2014 – 6:06 pm | No Comment

Helping children develop language and grammar skills has always been important to U of M Master of Education student Anastassiya Yudintseva. As an English and French teacher in her homeland of Kazakhstan, Yudintseva says her students often found grammar studies “difficult and not relevant” and even “boring. So, for her thesis here at U of […]

Breakfast with the Dean brings education partners together
December 9, 2014 – 3:37 pm | No Comment

A variety of stakeholders from the field of education came together recently to share ideas and learn about the future direction of the Faculty of Education during the 2nd annual Breakfast with the Dean. Dr. David Mandzuk, Dean of the Faculty, said this sort of gathering of various education stakeholders is unique within the province […]

3MT application portal opens Wednesday
December 8, 2014 – 6:01 pm | No Comment

Originally posted on UM Today: December 8, 2014  Do you “know your stuff” well enough to explain your research to a non-specialist audience? Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) is open to all University of Manitoba graduate students in thesis-based programs. Each challenger has three minutes―using only a single static slide as an illustration―to clearly explain the […]

Volunteer Opportunity: Graduate students wanted
November 12, 2014 – 10:38 pm | No Comment

The University of Manitoba is hosting the 11th annual Educational Developers Caucus Conference from Feb. 11-13, 2015. We are looking for student volunteers, preferably graduate students, to help with the conference. Please visit: http://fluidsurveys.com/s/edc2015-volunteer-registration/ to register. Volunteers receive: Access to Conference and Sessions Free T-Shirt Snacks Experiential Learning Sign up today!    

Want adventure? Teach in France!
October 31, 2014 – 7:29 pm | No Comment

For those wanting a different teaching experience, the French Ministry of National Education is offering over 200 English assistant positions in France. As an assistant, your role will be to improve your students’ confidence in spoken English through interactive and recreational activities. Students will also expect you to introduce them to Canadian culture. You will […]

A New International Research Network on Intersectionality, Knowledge Mobilization, and Social Justice in Education
April 22, 2014 – 7:43 pm | No Comment

In the context of the current social and economic climate globally, issues around identity and social justice come to the fore of political, theoretical and practical discussions. Researchers, practitioners and policy makers are confronted with challenges of how to address social inequalities and promote social justice for present and future generations. Yet efforts towards socially […]

DID YOU TAKE THE CALL?
April 8, 2014 – 6:50 pm | No Comment

From the halls of the Frank Kennedy Centre, in a noisy room, sits a group of bright, articulate and eager students who have a difficult job to do – asking strangers for money. Did you take the call? Each year the Dean of the Faculty of Education meets with these student callers to bring the […]

Writing for human rights (Reposted from UM Today)
March 25, 2014 – 5:37 pm | No Comment

March 24, 2014: Isabel Campoy is confident that children have the courage and creativity to help secure human rights for themselves and their families. After all, she was still in high school when she was jailed for defying the Spanish fascist dictator Franco. See the complete story here: http://news.umanitoba.ca/writing-for-human-rights

New teacher institute will focus on the ‘Fourth R’: Rights
March 20, 2014 – 2:44 pm | No Comment

  See the UM Today article about the Faculty of Education and Canadian Museum of Human Rights summer session institute here > http://news.umanitoba.ca/new-teacher-institute-will-focus-on-the-fourth-r-rights/